Libri Mysteriorum

open.pngThis series of scrolls is written by two Azeryan astronomers circa 428TR. Guided by their (unnamed) muse, they studied the stars and identified “friendships” between them. These friendships dictated that certain stars move together, while others always move in opposition. These patterns formed the first understanding of astrological sunsigns and the work provides the foundation for the names of each element of the modern astrological zodiac. The patterns are further analysed to create cusps, showing when one sign is in ascension and the opposite in declination. The authors struggle with the philosophy of the nature of what it means to be born into a cusp. Surprisingly, less than 300 years later, we completely accept their hesitant discourse as truth.

The scrolls detail the “good” and “evil” sides of each sign; a philosophy that has fallen out of favour since the writing of these scrolls, but at one time was held as truth. The authors do not explain why certain aspects are evil, only identifying their darker sides. Later scholars assume it was a question of mathematics; the signs with more negatives were deemed evil for simplicity; where as now we see these darker signs as more complex with more subtlity.

The scrolls do not differentiate between stars, planets and other heavenly bodies. Later works correct the Libri Mysteriorum of its concept of wandering stars (specifically relating to comets and asteroids). The work also lacks detailed drawings that later works created from their descriptions.

Regardless of the corrections, the Libri Mysteriorum is considered mandatory readings for all astrologers and any Satia Maravi intent on understanding sunsigns and how they affect the mystical.

Variations

There are five known variations of this work.

Understanding the sun and the stars

A detailed treaties that specifically identifies the key stars for each of the 12 sunsigns. It associates each star with a base element or philosophy and then uses these base concepts to construct a personality. This is the most common variation of the Libri Mysteriorum. It focuses less on the stars and the movement of the heavens and more on the philosophy of man, as explained by the stars.

Author Lanast Kevar
Year c. ~445TR
Medium Cyperus papyrus
Pages 3 feet
Language/Script Azeryan/Lakise
Street value 10d
Copies 100+

Location: Copies of this work are fairly common, located in most chantries and libraries of devout Save K`norists. A few copies can also be found in private libraries and for sale in larger book markets.

Life in the stars

A strange set of scrolls that are the basis for later woodcuts. Believed to be derived from Libri Mysteriorum is is also credited to be from one of its authors. Few accept the work as anything more as a flight of fantasy. The author purports to identify the location of each home of the gods in the sky. Specific stars are said to be the homes of each god without exception. This flies in the face of the known fact of the location of the religious heavens and mixes religion with astrology. While this was never completely accepted, it does represent a popular scholarly opinion from its time which has since been completely disproved.

Author Lanast Kevar
Year c. ~445TR
Medium Cyperus papyrus
Pages 3 feet
Language/Script Azeryan/Lakise
Street value 10d
Copies 100+

Location: The work is politically unpopular among the religious. While a copy probably does exist in most libraries that specialize in astrology, the copies are typically older or damaged.

Wonderment in the heavens

This set of scrolls features highly detailed drawings and is considered to be the source of many of the later woodcuts used in astrological texts. The drawings are said to be the work of X; although Y is credited with the work. There is very little text among the drawings, leading many scholars to brand this work as the work of an amateur that was more interested in the visuals of the stars than the philosophy to which they comport. Still, the views of the stars from this scroll focus on the key stars identified in the Libri Mysteriorum. The work is valued for its artistic quality and is rarely adorned in any way.

Author Feriam Orprin
Year c. ~510TR
Medium Cyperus papyrus
Pages 4 feet
Language/Script Azeryan/Lakise
Street value 100d
Copies 25+

Location: Rarely copied due to the technical difficulties implied by the quality of the art, this is a prized possession of any astrologer. Rarely seen in public markets, a few copies are known to be in the larger libraries of Kanday and Melderyn.

Libri Mysteriorum (original)

Copies of the original work are popular and circulate regularly with little to no changes in the text. Associated works (like In the valley of the night) are common, but hte original work is still valued for its insigths into the philosophy of the stars.

Author Lanast Kevar and Esaral Zhal
Year c. ~428TR
Medium Cyperus papyrus
Pages 1 foo
Language/Script Azeryan/Lakise
Street value 15d
Copies 75+

Location: Popular among scholars and historians more than astrologers, this work is regularly found in medium to large sized libraries and is considered a good “practice text” to copy for beginners in scriptoriums all over north-western Lythia.

Skills

Skill Understanding the sun and the stars Life in the stars Wonderment in the heavens Libri Mysteriorum
Numerology 40/1 0/0 0/0 40/2
Astrology 30/2 30/1 0/0 30/2
Astronomy 55/1 0/0 41/2 55/2

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Libri Mysteriorum

Signs and portents ketherian